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Gender Coordinator Training Report - 2014
Induction Training Report of Nodal Teachers - 2014
Report DIET faculty - 2014

Body Changes

Puberty is the process of physical changes by which a child's body matures into an adult body capable of reproduction, as initiated by hormonal signals from the brain to the gonads; the ovaries in a girl, the testes in a boy. In response to the signals, the gonads produce hormones that stimulate the growth, function, and transformation of the brain, bones, muscle, blood, skin, hair, breasts, and sexual organs. Physical growth — height and weight — accelerates in the first half of puberty and is completed when the child has developed an adult body. Until the maturation of their reproductive capabilities, the pre-pubertal, physical differences between boys and girls were the genitalia, the penis and the vagina. Notable among the morphologic changes in size, shape, composition, and functioning of the pubertal body, is the development of secondary sex characteristics, the “filling in” of the child’s body; from girl to woman, from boy to man. Derived from the Latin puberatum (age of maturity), the word puberty describes the physical changes to sexual maturation, not the psychosocial and cultural maturation denoted by the term “adolescent development” in Western culture, wherein adolescence is the period of mental transition from childhood to adulthood, which overlaps much of the body’s period of puberty.

Pubic hair often appears on a boy shortly after the genitalia begin to grow. The pubic hairs are usually first visible at the dorsal (abdominal) base of the penis. The first few hairs are described as stage 2. Stage 3 is usually reached within another 6–12 months, when the hairs are too many to count. By stage 4, the pubic hairs densely fill the "pubic triangle." Stage 5 refers to the spread of pubic hair to the thighs and upward towards the navel as part of the developing abdominal hair.

The first physical sign of puberty in girls is usually a firm, tender lump under the center of the areola of one or both breasts, occurring on average at about 10.5 years of age.[28] This is referred to as thelarche. By the widely used Tanner staging of puberty, this is stage 2 of breast development (stage 1 is a flat, prepubertal breast). Within six to 12 months, the swelling has clearly begun in both sides, softened, and can be felt and seen extending beyond the edges of the areolae. This is stage 3 of breast development. By another 12 months (stage 4), the breasts are approaching mature size and shape, with areolae and papillae forming a secondary mound. In most young women, this mound disappears into the contour of the mature breast (stage 5), although there is so much variation in sizes and shapes of adult breasts that stages 4 and 5 are not always separately identifiable.

The average age at which puberty begins may be affected by race as well. For example, the average age of menarche in various populations surveyed has ranged from 12 to 18 years. The earliest average onset of puberty is for African-American girls and the latest average onset for high altitude subsistence populations in Asia. However, much of the higher age averages reflect nutritional limitations more than genetic differences and can change within a few generations with a substantial change in diet. The median age of menarche for a population may be an index of the proportion of undernourished girls in the population, and the width of the spread may reflect unevenness of wealth and food distribution in a population.

Recent News & Events
  • 1. 597 nodal teachers were trained in Life skills & SRH education program in 2014.
  • 2. Consultation meeting with commissioner-cum-Project director ,OPEPA , Odisha for rolling out the intervensions in all KGBVs of Odisha .
  • 3. 90 peer educators organized Community Awareness Program on Life skills & SRH during summer vacation (May and June) 2014.
  • 4. Consultation meeting with commissioner-cum-secretary ,SC and ST development department for upscaling the intervention in 30 districts of Odisha.
  • 5. Organised training for 41 newly inducted District Resource persons on LSE & ARSH .
  • 6. Organised training for 55 newly inducted KISS teachers on LSE & ARSH .
  • 7. Organised Capacity building training on life skills based SRH education for 66 teacher educators under DIET at Puri from 3rd to 5th Sept'14.
  • 8. Organised Training program on Life Skills based SRH education for 30 Gender Coordinators under OPEPA at Puri from 2nd to 4th Sept'14 .
Recent Visitors
  • Visit of Dr. Mark Derueuw, the Deputy Country Representative, UNFPA India.
  • Visit of Mrs. Aparajita Sarangi, Commissioner cum Secretary, School & Mass Education Department, Government of Odisha.
  • Visit of Shri Vilasrao Deshmukh, Hon'ble Union Minister of Science & technology and Earth Sciences, Government of India.
  • Visit Of Dr. Dinesh Agarwal UNFPA, New Delhi.
  • Mr. Anders Thomsen, Deputy Representative India, UNFPA visited and witnessed the Nodal Teachers Training Programme.
  • Mr. S.K. Popli, Director, SSD Department, Govt. of Odisha will visited and witnessed the Nodal Teachers Training Programme.
  • Visit of Ms. Frederika Meijer, Representative, UNFPA, India